Tag Archives: autonomy

Year 2019 — Volume 13 — Issue 25

decolonizing syntax: an indigenous dissertation
Pages: 1-14

abstract
this article highlights and discusses the protocols/processes followed in pursuing a doctoral dissertation that broke with the traditional tone and conventions of english academic writing while decolonizing its syntax using examples from his own culture and language the author privileges indigenous knowledge that illustrates the limitations of current thought about academic freedom from abstracts international to a university research ethics board there is much work to be done in opening up freedom of expression when it comes to the english language the positive news comes from the dissertation usage statistics that shows a worldwide interest
Dr. Patrick STEWART

v13251


Impact Of British Colonialism On The Education System In Bangladesh
Pages: 15-22

Abstract
This paper contextualizes the problem of the colonial legacy of British rule over India to some of the current problems Bangladesh is facing in its education, management and corruption issues. It looks to highlight these issues from a management, organization theory, epistemological and educational perspective.
Dr. Meinhaj HOSSAIN

v13252


Trusting Children: Lifelong Learning And Autonomy Within The Unschooling Movement
Pages: 23-40

Abstract
The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of autonomy in the context of education and analyse the complex features of unschooling, a particular movement within the home- based education paradigm. This study will aim to link the significance of autonomy and unschooling and place them within the wider discourse of contemporary lifelong learning (LLL) theories. Under the tenets of humanistic education theories that underline self-driven and intrinsic motivations for learning, this article will highlight the unschooling movement as an example of a subaltern pedagogical approach that is deeply rooted in institutional and ideological autonomy. More importantly, this study intends to challenge the way LLL is conceptualised and propel the international discourse surrounding it beyond the boundaries of institutional education.
Lorena SÁNCHEZ TYSON

v13253


The Salt Of Ignorance: Education And The Wounded Child
Pages: 41-59

Abstract
Childhood trauma has widespread implications on individuals across the length of a lifetime, impacting physical, mental, and emotional health. The author uses narrative to explore the past schooling experiences of an educator in public education, who was being abused at home throughout childhood. Through past-to-present storytelling, the author examines the ways in which practices and policies within public education systems have had, and may continue to have negative impacts on students living with complex (childhood) trauma. The author draws upon the work of Dr. Bruce Perry and Mia Szalavitz and their “The Boy Who was Raised as a Dog And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist’s Notebook, emphasizing their research in relational health and connectedness to support the healing of children with complex trauma. She considers the challenges in creating authentic, healing spaces in mainstream schools for traumatized students, and how the embodiment of holistic education values, beliefs, and practices can offer the love and nurturance needed to support the healing of children living with trauma.
Kaley RECOSKIE

v13254

 

Year 2015 — Volume 9 — Issue 18

An Exploration Of Engagement, Motiviation And Student-Centered Learning In Physical Education
Pages: 1-14

Abstract
This author examines the discrepancy between the known benefits of physical activity and the startling statistics of obesity in children between the ages of 12 and 17. She queries if it is time to look at educators as contributing to this problem and questions if our current teaching styles and curriculum are working for students. In addition, the author explores the question if by allowing our students autonomy, will this equate to engagement and motivation to continue to participate in physical activities? Through a discussion of her personal experiences and a literature review focusing on the areas of autonomy, engagement and motivation, the author shares input into how and why some students experience physical education in a negative manner, and some things that educators can do to improve student engagement and motivation. Her argument demonstrates that an autonomous, student-centered teaching approach will positively affect student engagement, which in turn causes motivation and a desire to participate in life-long physical activity.
Barbara WARNER

v9181


Categorical Alternatives: An Educational Criticism Study
Pages: 15-35

Abstract
In the writing of this paper, the design of which is based on Elliot Eisner’s Educational Criticism model, both linguistic and non-linguistic description were used to encourage the interpretation and evaluation of a specific and unique alternative educational setting. Five years ago, Ellen’s Learning Annex, a multi-age, one-room school house, was just next door to the researcher, while her son was struggling at the public school a mile away. A day spent observing Ellen and her students yielded data from which three general themes emerged: Heterogeneous age-grouping, place-based education, and sensory integration in a teaching and learning environment.
Elizabeth J. EVANS

v9182


Educational Cooperatives And The Changing Nature Of Home Education: Finding Balance Between Autonomy, Support, And Accountability
Pages: 36-63

Abstract
Four families’ experiences in an educational cooperative and the impact on their home schools are detailed in the study. Results indicated that the families were highly dependent upon the cooperative. The cooperative signified a compromise for the families between the freedom of home schooling and the accountability and support provided by a school. These findings are important for traditional education. Just as home schools are evolving and developing institutions that look something like schools, schools can change too. One way is for the traditional school to operate as a family and community resource rather than the sole purveyor of knowledge.
Kenneth V. ANTHONY

v9183


Is There A Curriculum In This House?
Pages: 64-71

Abstract
Unschoolers are sometimes regarded as using “no curriculum.” This article proposes that curriculum is a path of thought inherent to everyone who thinks. Curriculum is determined not by external sources but by the interaction between the flow of external sources and the actively mediating consciousness of the living learner. This is true whether one is schooling, homeschooling, unschooling or other, because the inner curriculum constantly flows and overcomes obstacles, just as a river finds its way
around dam.
Aravinda PILLALAMARRI

v9184